Tomorrow, a machine as your manager?

Artificial intelligence is at the heart of every debate. Companies and governments alike are acquiring substantial resources to stay in the running against the American and Chinese giants.

Why some tasks might be better suited to employees with lower emotional intelligence…

Are you in touch with how your emotions at work impact the organisation or your co-workers? Are you able to regulate your feelings so as to make best use of them in a given situation? If so, you probably score well for emotional intelligence (EI)…. And surely that’s a good thing!

Towards new models to secure the careers of autonomous workers? The case of SMart

Interview with Benjamin Huybrechts, co-author of the article entitled “How Can New Players Establish Themselves in Highly Institutionalized Labour Markets? A Belgian Case Study in the Area of Project-Based Work”, to be published in the British Journal of Industrial Relations.

Why Mundane and Everyday Politics can be the most effective social movement of all

Trump, Brexit, the Occupy movement….Events in recent years have shown us that various groups of people around the world are disenfranchised and feel marginalised.

What business can learn from the Vienna refugee crisis of 2015

In September 2015, the city of Vienna was thrust to the fore of the nascent EU migrant crisis as Austria threw open its borders and welcomed a raft of largely Syrian migrants from neighbouring Hungary. Between September and end of the year the city welcomed 300,000 refugees. […]

EU-funded SMEs outperform their competitors

A new research paper from Fabio Bertoni, professor of Finance at emlyon business school, joint with Anita Quas (University of Milan) and Massimo Colombo (Politecnico di Milano), shows that SMEs that receive funding from the EU through European Investment Fund (EIF) guaranteed loans, drastically outperform those that don’t.

Debate: How social enterprises can help rethink business growth

The rationale for economic growth at the macro level has been hotly debated in academic and policy circles. On the one hand, growth is conventionally said to bring jobs and economic prosperity to people. On the other, growth with, as its corollary, ever-increasing consumption, have put a massive strain on the Earth’s natural resources and the living organisms depending on them...

Can we delegate customer relations to machines?

As the world’s leading robot manufacturer, Japan is particularly well placed to test new robotic applications. In 2015, the media reported the launch of a new type of hotel near Nagasaki: the Henn Na Hotel, staffed almost entirely by robots.

How managers create a sense of justice

Research has shown that commitment and well-being at work are fostered by a sense of being treated fairly, and that withdrawal or antagonistic behaviours stem from a sense of being treated unfairly. However, feeling fairly treated is not limited to “a fair pay for a fair day of work”. It also relates to the way in which decision-making processes and human interactions are assessed. A two-step heuristic process has thus been developed to help managers build environments that employees consider fairer.

Actions speak louder than their words to potential investors

One of the key challenges for start-ups and entrepreneurs who are not privileged enough to already have large sums of money at their disposal, is acquiring the vital funds needed to transform their ideas into reality. There are many ways to attempt to obtain this funding such as personal connections, crowdfunding or government start-up schemes, what these methods have in common is they all involve trying to persuade others that your product or service is worth investing in.

What will Work look like in 2030?

Work is changing and so is society as a whole. Debates on its future have been particularly animated over the past three years, (re)launched by discussions on digital technologies, self-employment, individuals with multiple careers (slashers), universal income, or questions of new forms of management, solidarity and governance.

Does being beautiful make you a more electable director?

Would George Clooney make a successful company director? Or, Angelina Jolie the best president? Or, maybe Brad Pitt the next CEO of a Fortune 500 company? Well, it certainly would fit a notion that has always been believed - the more attractive a person is, the more likely it is that their looks positively affect their professional career, and the more likely they are to be successful.

The manager is dead, long live the egopreneur!

Many people are announcing the end of management. For some, management can no longer be viewed as the formalisation of delegated decision. For others, the increased complexity of companies implies that managers will disappear to give free rein to local initiatives.

Does the future of research lie in weaving?

Some researchers have recently questioned the realities of doctoral life in management science research. Certain senior colleagues highlight the moroseness and apprehension of today’s doctoral students, while the same doctoral students, on the other hand, affirm their curiosity and collective spirit.

In support of “organic” management, more living than digital

One of the main features of the processes initiated by the expansion of digitalisation and the development of artificial intelligence, which is currently establishing itself as the only and inevitable means of “progress” in the future, is the desire to conquer and "ideologically" transform managers and organisations portrayed as "ill-adapted, or even obsolete".

Will we all soon be "egopreneurs"?

In his speeches, President Macron repeatedly refers to the concepts of "ability" and "enablement". The idea of working to improve each person's freedom and ability to act is a political issue that also directly affects management practices and corporate history.

The public decision-maker in the face of uncertainty: towards the technical democracy?

The development of uncertainty resulting from scientific and technical innovation is a particular challenge for the public decision-maker. The time when he could decide on a major program and impose it on the people is gone forever. As authority cannot be based on knowledge anymore, a new approach is needed that requires the involvement of the stakeholders to the decision.

Marketing in the age of connected photography

In 2017 alone, 1.3 trillion photos (1012) are expected to be taken, compared to around 90 billion in 2000 and 350 billion in 2010. Every day, 350 million photos are shared on Facebook and 80 million on Instagram. Every minute, 300 hours of videos are uploaded to YouTube... These figures illustrate the dizzying pace at which images are created in our society.

Looking away: Civilised indifference in the modern workplace

As a sociologist, David Courpasson studies new forms of organizations in the workplace and their impact on day-to-day workers’ lives. Here, he points out the paradox between everyone’s perception of a modern workplace, source of engagement and strong involvement, and employees' ordinary mutual insensitivity.[...]

Don’t speak like a chipmunk

The way business people use their voices during high-level negotiations is critical to determining success. They could learn a lot from how military and police negotiators speak in extreme situations such as during hostage negotiations.

Bribery and Investment

Interview with Addis Birhanu, Professor in strategy and author of the article "Bribery and investment: firm-level evidence from Africa and Latin America", published in the academic review: "Strategic Management Journal".