Taking over a business – the questions you need to ask yourself before taking the plunge

The decision to buy a company is a strategic choice, both personal and professional, and not only for you, but also for your family and friends. It will have a considerable impact on the dynamics of each of these actors’ lives.

Becoming an entrepreneur generates significant change in the life of the future business owner and consequently in the lives of his or her close circle of family and friends. It is not a simple change of activity, context, or environment, but involves a change of direction and risk-taking on a professional, social, and economic level. Taking over a company first and foremost means being able to make the commitment to embark on a potentially lengthy adventure, lasting between six and 24 months, or even more, and involving various stages, obstacles, and arbitrations over time.

It is therefore important to ask yourself two questions, “Is this the right project for me?” and “What are my ambitions, my goals, my desires for the next three, five to seven, or ten years?” […]

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Marie-Josée Bernard, emlyon business school

My main mission is to promote the development of collective and relational intelligence within organisations. This contributes to a company’s good balance and health by respecting and strengthening the physical, moral, psychological and emotional well-being of the individuals who create value for these companies. The approaches mobilized allow the individuals to grow their potential while respecting their own personal values. Management and leadership skills are crucial to the creation of new forms of human dynamics.

More information on Marie-Josée Bernard:
• Her CV online
• Her Viadeo page
• Her ResearchGate page


By the same author:

In support of “organic” management, more living than digital

May 16th, 2018|Categories: Marie-Josée Bernard, Work & Organizations|

One of the main features of the processes initiated by the expansion of digitalisation and the development of artificial intelligence, which is currently establishing itself as the only and inevitable means of “progress” in the future, is the desire to conquer and "ideologically" transform managers and organisations portrayed as "ill-adapted, or even obsolete".

Apr 11th, 2019|

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